AI in Business: New Decision-Makers on the Rise

 (This podcast originally aired in July, 2016. Earlier this year, Dan O'Hara joined Accenture as an AI Growth and Strategy Lead)

(This podcast originally aired in July, 2016. Earlier this year, Dan O'Hara joined Accenture as an AI Growth and Strategy Lead)

According to a recent study published by Oxford University, 47 percent of American jobs could be lost to automation in the next 20 years. Artificial intelligence (AI) is here and when it comes to innovating and disrupting the workforce, robots have become an increasing part of the conversation. But it’s rare to hear experts sound off on AI moving into white-collar professions.

This week on In Process: Conversations about Business in the 21st Century, hosts Evelyn Ashley and John Monahon of Trusted Counsel revisit a previously aired podcast from July, 2016. They were joined by Dan O’Hara, (the former) Senior VP of Digital Workplace at Avanade to have a conversation about AI. O’Hara has been in the software and technology industry for more than 25 years. Dan is a thought leader on the use of AI in business—including the concept of a robo-boss—and has presented on the topic in various venues as well as experienced the phenomenon for himself during a driving stint with Uber.  

According to Dan, “We don’t have robots that can take over right now. They can’t take over the grid and have terminators and things like that. We do have to put rules in place on how we’re going to use them, what decisions that they can make, what decisions do we want a human to make? That boundary will continually change…”

During the course of the podcast you will learn:

  • The digital workplace and its solutions
  • Artificial intelligence capabilities
  • How data and analytics lead to AI
  • Thoughts about AI for smaller organizations

Don’t miss a single episode, subscribe to our podcast show ‘In Process Podcast’ on iTunes to receive this episode as well as future episodes to your smartphone.

*Note that our guest misspoke in the podcast and the traffic death statistics were per year, not per day. For the statistic, click here.